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   Veterinary Public Health in a Global Economy
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   In Tribute to the late Martin Kaplan, VMD
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Veterinary Public Health in a Global Economy

The Livestock Revolution, Sustainable Development, Zoonotic Disease
Conference Audio and Video - Cees de Haan

Cees de Haan Cees de Haan
Agriculture and Rural Development
The World Bank

 

Audio of Mr. de Haan's lecture (MP3 format; 27 minutes)

Video of Mr. de Haan's lecture (RealVideo format; 27 minutes)

Biography

Mr. Cornelis (Cees) de Haan graduated with a degree in animal production from Wageningen University, the Netherlands in 1966. From 1966-1967, he worked in dairy research and development in Ecuador and in small holder agriculture in Peru. He then moved to Africa, where until 1983 he occupied the posts of senior scientist and later deputy director general (research) of the International Livestock Center for Africa in Addis Ababa. He joined the World Bank in Washington, DC in 1983, initially as senior livestock specialist for West Africa and later for Eastern Europe and the Middle East. From 1992 until 2001 he occupied the post of senior advisor for livestock development, responsible for the livestock development policies of the World Bank. He is now retired but still works as consultant on animal agriculture for the World Bank. His main interests are institutional aspects of livestock development, livestock and the environment, food safety issues and livestock and poverty reduction. He has published extensively on these subjects.

Abstract

The Main Environmental and Health Impact of the Livestock Revolution

Following the introductory paper by Dr. Steinfeld on the overall changes in the global livestock sector, this paper will look more specifically at the veterinary policies and institutions needed in the developing world to produce safe and affordable milk and meat for domestic and international markets. This will include a discussion on the options and issues regarding the required veterinary service infrastructure for different categories of countries according to their development level and access to world markets.
   
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