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Lab 9 Appendix: Small Animal Parasite Review - Dog

Parasite

Location in Host

Diagnostic Stage*

Lab Specimen+

Spirocerca lupi

esophagus

eggs in feces

B 90

Dipylidium caninum

small intestine

proglottids (eggs) in feces

SSB 4,5,6

Echinococcus granulosus

small intestine

proglottids (eggs) in feces

SSB 9

E. multilocularis

small intestine

proglottids (eggs) in feces

 

Taenia ovis, etc.

small intestine

proglottids (eggs) in feces

B 14, SSB 1,2,3

Ancylostoma caninum

small intestine

eggs in feces

SSB 29

A. braziliense

small intestine

eggs in feces

 

Strongyloides stercoralis

small intestine

larva in feces

 

Toxocara canis

small intestine

eggs in feces

B24

Uncinara stenocephala

small intestine

eggs in feces

 

Mesocestoides sp.

small intestine

proglottids in feces

 

Giardia

small intestine

cyst in feces

 

Sarcocystis

small intestine

sporocyst in feces

B 181

Isospora sp.

small intestine

oocysts in feces

B 157

Cryptosporidium

small intestine

oocysts in feces

SSB 97

Neospora caninum

sm. intestine, brain

oocysts if in sm. int., serology

 

Toxoplasma gondii

brain, other tissues

none (serology)

SSB 49

Entamoeba histolytica

large intestine

cyst in feces or trophozoites in diarrhea

Trichomonas spp.

large intestine

trophozoite in diarrhea

 

Trichuris vulpis

large intestine

eggs in feces

B 25, SSB 37

Dirofilaria immitis

pulmonary artery

microfilaria in blood

SSB 34, 35

Filaroides spp.

lungs

larva in feces

B 113

Capillaria aerophila

lungs

eggs in feces or sputum

B61

Capillaria plica

Urinary bladder

eggs in urine

B 61

Paragonimus kellicotti

lungs

eggs in feces or sputum

B 142

Leishmania donovani

Macrophages

maybe seen in ascites from peritoneal cavity or aspirate from lymph nodes.

SSB 41

Babesia canis

red blood cells

in RBCs

SSB 54

Dioctophyma renale

kidney

eggs in urine

 

Pneumonyssus caninum

nasal cavity

adults in nasal swab

 

Otobius megnini

ear

adults seen

 

Otodectes cyanotis

external ear

adults seen

 

Sarcoptes scabiei

skin

adults in skin scrape

SSB 88

Demodex canis

skin

adults in skin scrape

SSB 90

Ixodes scapularis

skin

tick seen on skin

 

Dermacentor variabilis

skin

tick seen on skin

SSB 96

Rhipicephalus sanguineus

skin

tick seen on skin

SSB 95

Ctenocephalides sp.

skin

adults on skin

SSB 75

Linognathus setosus

skin

adults on skin

SSB 78

Trichodectes canis

skin and hair

adults on skin

SSB 77

Cuterebra sp.

skin

larva under skin

 

* Diagnostic stage in living host; serology and biopsy excluded. Where no diagnostic stage is present, serology or biopsy may be appropriate.

+ "B" = Bottle at end of bench, "SSB"= Student Slide Box Slide

Quiz Questions:

  1. An 8 week old puppy was brought in for its first checkup. The dog appeared healthy and the results of a routine fecal exam (ZnSO4 flotation with iodine staining) are shown below. Identify the parasite (it measures about 10 Ám).

Click here for the answer:

 

  1. An 8 week old puppy was brought in for its first checkup. The dog appeared healthy and the results of a routine fecal exam (ZnSO4 flotation with iodine staining) are shown below.
    1. Identify the parasite (it measures about 20 um).
    2. What is the difference between the parasite indicated by the arrow and the other 2 in the photomicrograph?

     

    Click here for the answer:

     

  2. A 4 week old puppy from Philadelphia  was brought into the clinic because it was listless.  The feces was black and tarry in texture.  A ZnSO4 fecal flotation revealed the parasite shown in the photomicrograph.
    1. Identify the parasite (it measures about 60 Ám).

    2. What is the most likely route of infection for this dog?

Click here for the answer:

 

  1. A 12 year old Coon Hound from Camden,  New Jersey was brought into the clinic because the owner noticed the dog was having difficulty defecating (tenesmus) and there was frank blood in the feces.  A saturated salt fecal flotation revealed the egg shown in the photomicrograph.
    1. Identify the parasite.
    2. Does the presence of this parasite explain the clinical signs seen in the dog?

Click here for the answer:

 

  1. A healthy 6 year old wire haired terrier from Media, PA (20 miles west of Philadelphia) is in the clinic for a routine check-up.  A ZnSO4 fecal flotation revealed the egg shown in the photomicrograph.  The egg is about 90 Ám long.
    1. Identify the parasite.
    2. Where would the adult parasites be found?

Click here for the answer:

 

  1. A 6 year old German Shepherd from Philadelphia was brought into the clinic because its owner noticed small white "rice grains" on its feces.  You crushed one of these "rice grains" between 2 slides and the result is shown in the photomicrograph below.
    1. Identify the parasite.
    2. How did the dog become infected?

Click here for the answer:

 

  1. A foxhound from a kennel in New Jersey was brought into the clinic because the owner notice it had alopecia (loss of hair) on its face.  Upon examination you noticed a lump (enlarged lymph node?) near the edge of the shoulder blade. A smear from the needle aspirate stained with Giemsa stain is shown in the photomicrograph.
    1. Identify the parasite (Red arrows, it measures between 3 and 5 Ám).
    2. What is the normal route of infection for this parasite?

Click here for the answer:

 

 

 


Copyright © 2006 - University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, All rights reserved.
Faculty: Dr. Thomas Nolan
Students: Molly Church V'09, Diana Knight V'08, Douglas Gilson V'05, Chris Dykhouse V'04, Kimberly Mah V'00

Comments or Questions contact Dr. Tom Nolan at: