Stephanurus dentatus

Pathogenesis

The extensive migrations of S. dentatus during its parasitic phase results in considerable damage to host organs. Skin penetration by infecting L3s may cause cutaneous lesions and swelling of superficial lymph nodes. Liver migrations produce a marked inflammatory reaction with eosinophilia. Repair of these lesions will result in liver scarring and cirrhosis. Migration of immature adults through other organs such as the pancreas may result in abscesses, fibrosis and adhesions.

Images showing liver lesions due to migrating Stephanurus dentatus

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Normal pig liver for comparison with the other images in this table
Image courtesy of Dr. Edward Batte

Stephanurus dentatus - liver lesions caused by migrating larvae and immature adults.
Image courtesy of Merial Inc

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Stephanurus dentatus - fibrotic tracks resulting from migrations of larvae and immature adults
Image courtesy of Merial Inc
Stephanurus dentatus - extensive fibrosis resulting from migrations of larvae and immature adults
Image courtesy of Dr Edward Batte


    

 

Parasites and Parasitic Diseases of Domestic Animals
Dr. Colin Johnstone (principal author)
Copyright 1998 University of Pennsylvania
This page was last modified on January 24, 2000